Jehovah’s Witnesses to hold regional conventions

Jehovah’s Witnesses are holding a three-day convention in more than 70 areas in the country entitled “Don’t Give Up!”

 

The lectures, which are based in the Bible, are designed to help the people endure despite prolonged illness, depression, loss of a loved one, unjust treatment, persecution, and other personal problems, according to Danilo Calso, convention spokesperson of the Jehovah’s Witnesses in the Philippines.

 

Calso said there will be multimedia presentations, interviews and demonstrations that are intended to provide comfort and hope to the people who are coping with life’s anxieties.

 

He said they are holding free Bible-based lectures every year as part of their public service to the community.

 

In Metro Manila, starting June 2-4, 2017 and every Friday to Sunday until August 18-20, 2017, series of conventions will be held at the Assembly Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Novaliches, Quezon City.

 

This year 2017 marked also the first in the history of the Philippines Branch to present the program in full Japanese. This will be held on August 19-20, 2017 at Amoranto Theater in Quezon City.

 

The convention will also be presented in English, Filipino, Punjabi, Japanese, Mandarin, Korean, Filipino Sign Language, Iloko, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, Waray-waray, Pangasinan and Bicol and other local dialects in the Philippines.

 

Admission is free and no collection will be taken.

For the date and venue of the convention near your area, please visit jw.org.

 

R&D center for local medicinal plants inaugurated

Photo shows (from L to R) Dr. Jaime Montoya, Executive Director of Philippine Council for Health Research and Development of the Department of Science and Technology; Dr. Dolores A. Ramirez, National Scientist; Dr. Teresita Borromeo, Professor and Head of the Plant Genetic Resource Division, UP Los Baños; Dr. Cecilia Maramba, Director of the National Institutes of Health; Dr. Fabian Dayrit, Professor, Department of Chemistry, Ateneo de Manila University; and Dr. Eliseo Banaynal, Executive Director of Sekaya.
Photo shows (from L to R) Dr. Jaime Montoya, Executive Director of Philippine Council for Health Research and Development of the Department of Science and Technology; Dr. Dolores A. Ramirez, National Scientist; Dr. Teresita Borromeo, Professor and Head of the Plant Genetic Resource Division, UP Los Baños; Dr. Cecilia Maramba, Director of the National Institutes of Health; Dr. Fabian Dayrit, Professor, Department of Chemistry, Ateneo de Manila University; and Dr. Eliseo Banaynal, Executive Director of Sekaya.

The Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD) and Filipino scientists were in full force during the recent inauguration of the Sentrong Katutubong Yaman (Sekaya) Research and Development plant, a facility that is envisioned to become a collaborative research and development center for local medicinal plant products.

Sekaya, an affiliate of United Laboratories, Inc. (Unilab), the leading pharmaceutical and healthcare company in the Philippines, was built as a platform to develop natural products grounded on science to help the indigenous communities and small farmers to protect and benefit from the country’s rich plant resources.

The Department of Science and Technology (DOST), through PCHRD, has been at the forefront of the government’s efforts to develop the herbal medicine landscape to maximize the potentials of plant-based medicines.

EU Delegation to host national debate

Coming off from the Europe Day celebration last week where the theme was promotion of rights of children and youth, the EU Delegation to the Philippines will again show its commitment to children and youth rights as they host yoEUth debate on Tuesday, 23 May 2017 at De La Salle University (DLSU) Manila.

 

“The future of the world and of the Philippines is with the children and the youth. We want to hear their voices,” said Ambassador Franz Jessen, Head of the EU Delegation.

 

The yoEUth debate will focus on the issues of human rights in business and economic freedom.

 

Representatives from nine schools from all over the Philippines, and three interns from European Union Member States, are participating in the event co-organized by the EU Delegation, Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom (FNF), and DLSU Manila.

 

DLSU Manila, University of the Philippines (UP) Diliman, UP Visayas,Ateneo de Davao University, Ateneo de Manila University, Ateneo de Zamboanga University, Mindanao State University, University of San Carlos Cebu and Xavier University Cagayan de Oro have signed up to participate. The debate will be in town hall and Asian parliamentary formats.

 

Senator Kiko Pangilinan will give the keynote speech, while Commission on Human Rights (CHR) Chair Chito Gascon will head the team of adjudicators. The EU community will be widely present, with The Netherlands Ambassador Marion Derckx and European Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines (ECCP) Guenter Taus sitting as judges, and European students attending.

 

YoEUth Debate moderators will be the tandem of Lasallian debaters Mikee De Vega and Jason Dizon, 2016 champions of the 36th World Universities Debating Championship (WUDC, Greece), the world’s largest annual debating tournament.

For more information, please contact FNF Project Assistant Danika Sarion at 8196086/ 87 or 0917 5423725.

 

Race to raise

Race to raise
From left to right: Guillaume D’Aboville, Vanessa Bandoy Hans, Carmela Serina Pearson, Colin Pearson

Racing has never been this good. Have you ever thought cycling for over 3000 miles across a country in just 9 days was impossible? Join the journey of these four hopefuls as they become the first mixed relay team to represent Southeast Asia and the Philippines in the world’s toughest and longest time trial race – Race Across America (RAAM). Currently on its 36th year, the annually held race will start in Oceanside, California and will run through 12 states, four rivers (the Colorado, Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio), and three major mountain ranges (the Sierra, Rocky, and Appalachian) to reach the finish line located in Annapolis, Maryland. This competition is open to both amateur and professional cyclists who may choose to compete solo, two-, and eight-person relay teams as long as they qualify the fitness test and have a strong passion for cycling.

 

Team David’s Salon, is comprised of two males and two female cyclists: Guillaume D’Aboville, a Frenchman living in the Philippines for more than three decades, Colin and Carmela Pearson, a Filipino-British couple, and Vanessa Bandoy Hans, a young French-Filipina. They are strongly supported by David’s Salon, Inc., Fuji Haya Electric, and LS Korea, who will accompany them in their journey to Maryland.

 

RAAM is more than just a test of strength, endurance, and team dynamics, but it is heavily anchored in social responsibility. Over the past 5 years, racers have raised over $2 million per year for the charities of their choice. Team David’s Salon is no different for they want to raise both awareness and funds for a foundation close to their hearts.

 

On November 8 2013, the Philippines was ravaged by the strongest storm that ever made landfall in the planet. Typhoon Haiyan, locally named as Yolanda, caused widespread destruction of property, loss thousands of lives, and over seven million individuals were displaced and left in despair. Hans, whose family originated from Guiuan, Eastern Samar, was the first municipality to experience its landfall, remembers waiting in Manila for several days before receiving news of safety from her relatives; however, many were not as fortunate as them. It may have not taken the lives of her family but it ruined their homes and prized possessions.

 

Immediately after the calamity, the French Embassy and the French Chamber of Commerce and Industry in the Philippines created a response team called France-Philippines United Action (FPUA) to address the needs of the victims.

 

With only three years under its wing, FPUA has achieved remarkable results that benefited thousands of individuals. The organization was able to built two villages and provide over 200 disaster-resilient homes for the survivors in Daanbantayan, Northern Cebu. This was made possible through the numerous donations it gathered from companies in France and in the Philippines and the foundation’s partnership with Habitat for Humanity and the Red Cross.

 

Even though it has been almost four years since its landfall, many are still living in extremely precarious conditions. Currently, FPUA is focused on building its third rehabilitation village in Bogo City, Northern Cebu which will benefit 46 families. The Foundation is committed to continue its mission to build resilient communities and provide safe, decent living for all. In line with this, FPUA also developed Health and Child Welfare programs for the communities.

With the numerous programs their charity of choice has made, the four cyclists wish to raise funds for the sustainability of the projects. This time trial is not only a matter of breaking their personal record but also committing themselves to a great cause.

Excel Feeds joins Mindanao Agri Expo

Philippine Foremost Milling Corporation (PFMC), maker of world-class animal feed brands Excel and Amigo for swine and Iron Claw for game fowl, is one of the main exhibitors in the recent Mindanao Agriculture and Livestock Expo in Davao City. Photo shows PFMC VP for Trade Feeds Engr. Terence Uygongco (third from left) at the Excel Feeds booth with company feed specialists who assist and give advise to livestock growers on animal nutrition. Promoting their new company slogan “Pusong Excel, Dito Ka Na Sa Ma-Alaga”, PFMC and Excel Feeds’ participation in the expo is in support of government’s call to help produce sufficient, quality and affordable food for Filipinos.
Philippine Foremost Milling Corporation (PFMC), maker of world-class animal feed brands Excel and Amigo for swine and Iron Claw for game fowl, is one of the main exhibitors in the recent Mindanao Agriculture and Livestock Expo in Davao City. Photo shows PFMC VP for Trade Feeds Engr. Terence Uygongco (third from left) at the Excel Feeds booth with company feed specialists who assist and give advise to livestock growers on animal nutrition. Promoting their new company slogan “Pusong Excel, Dito Ka Na Sa Ma-Alaga”, PFMC and Excel Feeds’ participation in the expo is in support of government’s call to help produce sufficient, quality and affordable food for Filipinos.

Unicef reaches almost half of the world’s children with life-saving vaccines

A boy gets vaccinated for measles-rubella during a mass immunization campaign in Region VIII, which Unicef supported. UNICEF PHOTO
A boy gets vaccinated for measles-rubella during a mass immunization campaign in Region VIII, which Unicef supported. UNICEF PHOTO
New York/Manila – Unicef procured 2.5 billion doses of vaccines to children in nearly 100 countries in 2016, reaching almost half of the world’s children under the age of five. The figures, released during World Immunization Week, make Unicef the largest buyer of vaccines for children in the world.  
 
In the Philippines, Unicef procured $33 million worth of vaccines in 2015 and 2016. The UN children’s agency also dedicated $1.5 million worth of technical assistance and supplies to strengthen immunization in urban poor and conflict areas to reach the most disadvantaged children. 
 
A Unicef staff member inspects vaccines with volunteer health workers at a government health center in Happyland, a slum area in Manila. UNICEF PHOTO
A Unicef staff member inspects vaccines with volunteer health workers at a government health center in Happyland, a slum area in Manila. UNICEF PHOTO

Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan, the three remaining polio-endemic countries, each received more doses of vaccines than any other country, with almost 450 million doses of vaccines procured to children in Nigeria, 395 million in Pakistan and over 150 million in Afghanistan. Unicef is the lead procurement agency for the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

 
Access to immunization has led to a dramatic decrease in deaths of children under five from vaccine-preventable diseases, and has brought the world closer to eradicating polio. Between 2000 and 2015, under five deaths due to measles declined by 85 per cent and those due to neonatal tetanus by 83 per cent. A proportion of the 47 per cent reduction in pneumonia deaths and 57 per cent reduction in diarrhea deaths in this time is also attributed to vaccines. 
 
Yet an estimated 19.4 million children around the world still miss out on full vaccinations every year. Around two thirds of all unvaccinated children live in conflict-affected countries. Weak health systems, poverty and social inequities also mean that 1 in 5 children under five is still not reached with life-saving vaccines.
 
The Philippines has achieved a number of successes in immunization. The immunization program has contributed to the reduction in the under-five mortality rates from 58.2 in 1990 to 28 in 2015 (World Bank, 2016). The country has maintained its polio free status since 2000 and will be validated for Maternal Neonatal Tetanus Elimination this year. Increasing government budget has enabled introduction of new vaccines like PCV13, HPV, IPV, Dengue vaccine and Rotavirus in selected areas. In 2018, Japanese Encephalitis vaccine will also be introduced. 
 
A Unicef staff member and health workers discuss immunization coverage in Happyland, a slum area in Manila. UNICEF PHOTO
A Unicef staff member and health workers discuss immunization coverage in Happyland, a slum area in Manila. UNICEF PHOTO

In terms of policy, a law has been enacted that mandates free immunization services for infants and children in all government hospitals and health centers. The provision of immunization services has now been expanded to school children, adolescents and senior citizens.

 
Despite these achievements, the Philippines has many opportunities for improving the immunization program.
 
“In the Philippines, there are still millions of unvaccinated children. Children in conflict areas and children in urban poor communities face hazards including overcrowding, unsafe water, air pollution, inadequate sanitation and garbage collection and lack of access to quality health services including vaccines. We must work together to reach all children everywhere, with a particular focus on the most underserved parts of the population,” Unicef Philippines Deputy Representive Julia Rees says. 
 
In the Philippine National Demographic Health Survey of 2013, only 68.5 per cent of children 12-23 months were fully immunized, a drop from 79.5 per cent in 2008. The national immunization coverage for all Vaccine Preventable Diseases (VAPD) is decreasing.  
A child receives oral polio vaccine during a mass immunization campaign in Tanauan, Leyte, four weeks after Typhoon Yolanda hit the area. UNICEF PHOTO
A child receives oral polio vaccine during a mass immunization campaign in Tanauan, Leyte, four weeks after Typhoon Yolanda hit the area. UNICEF PHOTO

“All children, no matter where they live or what their circumstances are, have the right to survive and thrive, safe from deadly diseases,” said Dr. Robin Nandy, Chief of Immunization at Unicef. “Since 1990, immunization has been a major reason for the substantial drop in child mortality, but despite this progress, 1.5 million children still die from vaccine preventable diseases every year.”

 
Inequalities persist between rich and poor children. In countries where 80 per cent of the world’s under-five child deaths occur, over half of the poorest children are not fully vaccinated. Globally, the poorest children are nearly twice as likely to die before the age of five as the richest.
 
“In addition to children living in rural communities where access to services is limited, more and more children living in overcrowded cities and slum dwellings are also missing out on vital vaccinations,” said Nandy. “Overcrowding, poverty, poor hygiene and sanitation as well as inadequate nutrition and health care increase the risk of diseases such as pneumonia, diarrhea and measles in these communities; diseases that are easily preventable with vaccines.”
 
By 2030, an estimated 1 in 4 people will live in urban poor communities, mainly in Africa and Asia, meaning the focus and investment of immunization services must be tailored to the specific needs of these communities and children, UNICEF said. 
 
In the Philippines, Unicef is helping the government reach all children by advocating to leaders at all levels of government to invest in health care to protect children from diseases.

Manila condo holds topping-up ceremony for 47th floor

victoria de manilaVictoria de Manila 2, regarded as one of Manila’s top-choice condominiums, recently held a top-up ceremony for its 47th floor.

Situated along Taft Avenue at the corner of Malvar Street, the topping-up rite held on April 27, 2017, now makes the condominium the tallest structure in this side of the city.

Victoria de Manila 2 offers tough competition to similar residences in the area, with its pricing and amenities that define what comfortable living is all about. It has a sports complex and offers unit owners and renters transport convince as well as high commercial and resale value.

The condo is within walking distance from various universities like UP Manila, Philippine Women’s University, Philippine Christian University, St. Paul University, De La Salle University, St. Scholastica’s University, Adamson University, Lyceum and Mapua. It is also near shopping centers like Robinson’s and SM, hospitals such as Philippine General Hospital, Ospital ng Maynila, and Manila Doctors’ Hospital.

It’s also just a few minutes’ walk away from the city’s historic sites like Intramuros and Roxas Boulevard.

With all these factors, Victoria de Manila 2 has become a top choice for students, professionals, businessmen and even sports buffs.

MLQU graduates urged: Be the game changers of the future

Graduates of the Manuel Luis Quezon University (MLQU) have been urged to become the catalyst of change and visionaries of the future. The challenge was made by MLQU president Isagani G. Germar at the recently held 69th commencement exercises held at the school grounds.

Former Vice President Noli de Castro, who delivered the commencement address, and Rep. and former Speaker Feliciano “Sonny” Belmonte graced the occasion.

In his remarks, Germar said the university’s new graduates from all academic programs will now form part of the rich manpower resource of the nation “whose years of hard work and dedication to their studies have prepared them to become young achievers and to be the best version of themselves.”

“These graduates are expected to banner MLQU’s ethos in making positive impacts in our society. They are tasked to be the catalyst of change assuming the roles of future enablers and leaders. They are the keys to making the impossible and the unbelievable to become realities of life; to triumph in every endeavor and phases of their lives, never doubters but believers of themselves,” Germar added.

MLQU, which is now owned by New San Jose Builders, Inc. (NSJBI), is in the forefront of producing the nation’s future leaders by providing its students with the latest advances in education methodology and state of the art facilities. These will enable all its graduates to cope not only with global changes but in becoming the future game changers and influencers of a global society.

MLQU’s roster of faculty members and deans include, among others, former Supreme Court Chief Justice Reynato Puno, Regent and Dean Emeritus College of Law; former Supreme Court Associate Justice Jose Perez, Dean of the School of Law; Professor Eric Soriano, Dean of the School of Accountancy, Business and Real Estate Management; and DPWH Undersecretary Raul Asis and former UP Dean of Architecture Danilo Sylvester as  special lecturers.